Drones

The sickest drone videos from around the web

The sickest drone videos from around the web 2668 2000 Dani Lyman

There’s no question that drones revolutionized video and changed our viewing experience. From nature docs to corporate events, drones have captured beautiful footage from interesting angles that weren’t possible to achieve in the past. However, with technology quickly advancing, certified drone operators are pushing boundaries and taking aerial cinematography to a whole new level. Drones are increasingly being utilized across multiple professions to create cinematic and awe-inspiring footage – and even aid in saving lives.

Here are a few sick videos from around the web that highlight the badass tricks and practical capabilities of the modern drone.

Smooth Operator

In this commercial, Ford teamed up with Aerial Edge to capture a stunning shot we don’t usually see. Going beyond the usual “from above” view, the pilot squeezes the drone through the trees to allow the car to drive out of frame in one seamless move. It’s cinematic, perfectly paced and really challenges the status quo. Drone footage like this, which follows the action, is much more stimulating and exciting to watch!

Tricky One Shot

Do not let the easy flow of this video fool you! To accomplish these tricks so precisely, the drone operator has to be wildly talented and must completely understand the technology he’s working with. It’s much harder than it looks! Not only does he fly backward throughout the entire shot (what!?), he also perfectly times his movements to fly through small objects and tight spaces with complete accuracy. This beautifully constructed one-shot leaves no room for mistakes. In just a few minutes the sun will rise and he’ll lose the piercing light creeping up over the city. No wonder this was the 2017 Drone Film Festival Winner.

Lifesaving Technology

Drone technology company Aerones provides a great example of the diverse use of drones outside of the video industry.  In 2017, Aerones launched a drone that is able to carry a human being! Despite the sheer joy on the face of the jumper in the video, this beast isn’t just for adrenaline junkies and extreme sports enthusiasts. The massive drone was designed, in part, to aid rescue teams by dropping a person into the action or pulling someone out of a dangerous situation. Afraid of heights? You might want to look away. But, I wouldn’t recommend it. This is epic.

 

It's easy to hire a video crew with a drone operator on CrewCloud

It’s easy to hire a video crew with a drone operator on Crew Connection

It’s easy to hire a video crew with a drone operator on Crew Connection 3100 2069 Crew Connection

Have you been itching to hire a video crew with a drone operator to capture epic aerial shots but are uneasy about the likelihood of breaking a few laws along the way? Well, it’s finally a whole lot easier to stay within the law. With the FAA’s Part 107 guidelines newly in effect, video crews will be lining up to take their tests and become certified to fly small unmanned aircrafts (UA) for commercial purposes.

What do the new rules mean for clients who want to hire a video crew for aerial shots?

  1. More affordability. Not long ago, epic aerial shots required an extra long jib or a manned helicopter, both of which put them well out of reach for the average production’s budget. Now all you need is a skilled drone operator who is willing to put their camera gear a couple hundred feet in the air.
  2. Less hassle. Just as the rise of UAs made arial shots more affordable, the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) strict rules on commercial operation kept them frustratingly out of reach. As the regulations relax, productions can skip the strict permitting processes, further opening the door to easy aerial photography.
  3. Better quality operators. As regulations get easier, competition among video crews will get stiffer. That means drone operators will get better at their craft and you’ll start to see a lot more highly-skilled operators. So along with more affordability and less hassle, you’re going to get higher-quality images.
  4. Better quality equipment. Aircraft technology continues to improve right alongside the increased demand for aerial images. As the equipment gets better and drone operators become more skilled, they’ll be more and more comfortable putting their 4K cameras into the air, rather than stopping at a GoPro or DSLR.
  5. Easier/quicker to find crews. All of the above add up to a new normal in the video production industry. Production companies all over the world will offer aerial footage as a regular service. That means you won’t have to dig as deep  into your contacts or your pockets to find crews who can provide all the coverage you want.

 How can I hire video crew with a drone operator?

It’s as easy as a few clicks on our custom international database of video production people and services.

When you create a profile, you can search video crews local to your next shoot location. Narrow your results by gear and services, such as drone crews. From there, contact crews via CrewCloud’s secure messaging system, compare cost estimates, and keep track of invoices without ever leaving your personal account! No matter how big the crew, complicated the gear, or far-flung the locale—Crew Connection has what you need in just a few clicks.

Questions about Crew Connection or looking to get hooked up with a drone crew ASAP? Our crew coordinators are on call around the clock if you ever need live assistance. Visit CrewConnection.com, call us at 303-526-4900, or shoot us an email at info@crewconnection.com.

 


 

About Crew Connection

Crew Connection logo

Crew Connection puts a world of video service providers at your fingertips. In just a few clicks you can search, chat with, and book vetted crews local to your shoot—all on your own schedule. Rely on Crew Connection’s team of media experts to organize the crews and gear you need for multi-day and multi-location video projects anywhere in the world.

Checklist for camera crews taking advantage of the FAA’s Part 107 regulations

Checklist for camera crews taking advantage of the FAA’s Part 107 regulations

Checklist for camera crews taking advantage of the FAA’s Part 107 regulations 5400 3600 Crew Connection

Notice to every eager camera crew wanting to use a Small Unmanned Air System (sUAS) for commercial purposes: the FAA’s Small Unmanned Aircraft Rule (Part 107) went into effect August 29th, 2016. You can expect to see a whole lot more cameras in the sky for commercial purposes.

Here are five things aspiring operators need to do to prepare:

 1. Check your eligibility and know the basic rules

 2. Sign up for the test at one of these FAA-approved testing centers

With 690 locations nationwide, you shouldn’t have trouble finding one near you. Note: if you already have an Part 61 pilot certificate, refer to the FAA’s fact sheet for information on your course of action.

 3. Prepare for the test

You may wish to conduct your own independent study on materials directly from the FAA. Alternatively, you can take a course designed specifically for the test. There are several online programs. Whatever direction you take, the UAV Drone Coach offers a free and thorough overview/study guide of what you can expect to see on the test, including regulations, effects of weather on small aircraft, emergency procedures, maintenance and pre-flight inspection procedures, airport operations, and more.*

 4. Check out our drone series for more info

Get tips from existing pilots on what to do before you put all that expensive gear in the air, make sure you’re inline with ever-changing regulations, and more.

 5. Have fun!

It’s about to get a whole lot easier to get stunning aerial shots!

About Crew Connection

Crew Connection logo

Questions about drones? Interested in gaining access to our international database of clients who are booking drone shoots daily? Our crew coordinators are on call around the clock. Sign In to Crew Connection, call 303-526-4900, or email info@crewconnection.com.

*We are not affiliated with the UAV Drone Coach in any way, but find their materials thorough and useful.

New FAA Drone Regulations Open Skies to Video Crews

New FAA Drone Regulations Open Skies to Video Crews

New FAA Drone Regulations Open Skies to Video Crews 760 350 Heidi McLean

The skies just got a whole lot friendlier for video crews who want to use drones for business!

Nearly two years ago we started covering the technology, penalties, and ever-changing guidelines surrounding how video crews could use drones for business. Finally, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has released their first definitive guide on drone piloting.

With these new rules now in place, the skies are about to get a whole lot busier. If you’re flying a commercial drone under 55 pounds, here’s what you need to know to fly high.

[Tweet “Here’s what you need to know about the FAA’s new #drone guidelines. #video #film”]

1) Here Comes The Sun

According to the new FAA laws, you’ll have to stick to flying during daylight hours unless your drone has lights that are visible for up to three miles.

2) Don’t Fly Too Close

You might need to fly in the sunlight, but you don’t need to fly into the sunlight. Commercial drones shouldn’t exceed 400 feet in the air. While it’s up there, your drone should remain in your line of sight or in sight of an observer you’re in touch with. And avoid flying over folks who aren’t part of your drone shoot unless you have approval.

3) Can’t Drive? Can’t Fly

Sorry, kiddos. Pilots must be at least 16 years old.

4) You’re Up, Maverick 

If you’re ready to be considered an aviator, you need to be ready to act like one, too. Pilots must pass an aeronautical test every two years.

5) Know Before You Go

States went ahead and passed rules while they were waiting for the big dogs to make a call. So it’s not just FAA laws you need to worry about—get familiar with local guidelines, as well.

Are you a drone operator or know someone who is? Our clients are looking for you! Contact one of our crew coordinators today or create a free profile on Crew Connection and beat your competition to the coolest drone shoots.


 

About Crew Connection

Crew Connection logo

Crew Connection puts a suite of marketing tools at your fingertips. Get your demo reels, stills, gear, awards, and more in front of the biggest clients all over the world—for free. At Crew Connection we pay video and post production providers within 30 days of receiving your invoice so your work and your life are never interrupted. Need live assistance or want to add quality jobs to your pipeline? Our crew coordinators are on call around the clock. Sign In to Crew Connection, call 303-526-4900, or email info@crewconnection.com.

What video crews need to know about the FAA's new drone regulations

What video crews need to know about the FAA’s new drone regulations

What video crews need to know about the FAA’s new drone regulations 6000 3500 Crew Connection

Before August 29, if you wanted permission to fly a drone for commercial use, you had to get the FAA 333 Exemption, which required a traditional pilot’s license, airtime, a kidney, and your firstborn*. Now, with the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) loosened regulations, it’s getting easier for video crews to make money by putting cameras in the air. But according to one longtime flyer (Kevin Sawicki of Sight and Sound Hawaii) there are a few things video crews should know before they go.

  1. It’s getting easier to fly for pay.
    The new Part 107 of Exemption 333 means the required stack of paperwork will shrink, video crews will be able to provide in-house drone services, and flight schools will offer certification courses.
  2. It’s getting harder to stand out.
    The big upside comes with a big downside, too. With every step the FAA takes to ease restrictions and with every equipment breakthrough that makes technology cheaper and better, the market gets more saturated. Kevin predicts drone services will be a standard feature for most production companies in the near future. If you want to stand out, you’ll have to fly very well and put your best gear in the sky.
  3. It’s getting less risky to put camera equipment in the sky.
    Speaking of all that great equipment, large devices can accommodate full-size cameras. But with all that weight and money flying around, you may want to get some experience before risking your best gear. DJI** has some fully functional prosumer aircrafts for around $1000 so you can be in the air capturing great footage within 30 minutes.
  4. But it’s also getting riskier to put a UAV in the air.
    Crowded airspace means it’s easier to collide with something or someone. And a lot of someones have their eyes on the skies. We are taking the first, wobbly steps into very new territory and if a UAV pilot hurts somebody or takes a plane down, it will be bad not just for those directly involved, but for the entire industry. It’s a big responsibility. They don’t consider UAV operators aviators for nothing.

Questions about drones? Interested in gaining access to our international database of clients who are booking drone shoots daily? Sign up for CrewCloud here, call us at 303-526-4900, or shoot us an email by clicking here anytime—day or night.

*According to an online drone trainer, “Many were challenged by the Section 333 Exemption process. From having to wait upwards of 5-7 months for their exemption to be granted to also needing to hold a traditional manned aircraft pilot license (sport, recreational, private, transport, or commercial), thousands of commercial drone pilots struggled to push their businesses forward.”

**Kevin is not paid or endorsed by DJI. He just trusts their technology.

Registering A Video Crew's Drone – Making Sense of FAA Regulations

Registering A Video Crew’s Drone – Making Sense of FAA Regulations

Registering A Video Crew’s Drone – Making Sense of FAA Regulations 1920 1280 Crew Connection

If your video crew is now offering sweeping footage captured by a drone, you have a new title. That’s right, in addition to being a business owner, DP, editor, cinematographer, and whatever other titles you carry, you’re now an aviator because the minute you send a UAV into the air, you’re officially joining the likes of the Wright brothers and Amelia Earhart (at least in the eyes of the law). Congratulations! Now it’s time to make it official.

While hobbyists can register online, video production crews/commercial users* must go through the paper registration process by:

1. Gathering and/or completing the following items: 

  • Evidence of ownership (a receipt, for example)
  • Registration Application (AC form 8050-1)
  • $5 registration fee made out to FAA Aircraft Registration Branch
  • Affidavit of Ownership that gives full description of aircraft. See the FAA’s template for guidance.

2. Mailing paperwork to:

FAA Aircraft Registration Branch

PO Box 25504

Oklahoma City, OK

73125

3. Phoning a friend:

If you need help, call the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) commercial aircraft registration line at 1-866-762-9434.

Why Register? 

It’s in your best interest to register quickly. This is the law of the land now and violations could land you some big fines and possible jail time. It’s not about spoiling your fun or costing you business –  It’s meant to keep everyone safer.

With millions of new aircraft competing for airspace and pilots reporting drone sightings from the cockpit, the FAA wants to decrease illegal activity and make sure people are flying responsibly. Registered drones will be marked with a tracking number in case of collisions or other violations.

Plus, clients will want to keep things above board and know their partners are registered. So  and happy flying!

*In addition to commercial operators, the FAA requires the paper registration process for anyone using the aircraft for any reason other than hobby and recreation, aircraft greater than 55 pounds, and international operation.

About Crew Connection:

Crew Connection connects you with video production crews across the country and around the globe. With more than 25 years of experience and thousands of shoots with film crew pros to our credit, you can trust our expert coordinators to match you with the right freelance video crew and equipment—every time.

Top Reasons to Register Your Drone (from Hobbyists to Video Crews)

Top Reasons to Register Your Drone (from Hobbyists to Video Crews)

Top Reasons to Register Your Drone (from Hobbyists to Video Crews) 730 730 Crew Connection

The minute you send an Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) into the air, you’re officially an aviator just like the Wright brothers and Amelia Earhart before you. That’s why the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is requiring all UAVs to be registered.

Here’s why it’s time to go ahead and register that drone:

It’s Cheap

If you purchased that drone, you can swing the five bucks it costs to register it. Seriously.

It’s Easy

Hobbyists can register online with just their name, address, email address, and a credit/debit card.

For video crews and other commercial operators, it’s a little harder, but we did the up-front work for you in this post.

It’s Safe(r)

With millions of new aircraft competing for airspace and pilots reporting drone sightings from the cockpit, the FAA wants to decrease illegal activity and make sure people are flying responsibly. Registered drones will be marked with a tracking number in case of collisions or other violations.

Jail Doesn’t Sound Fun

The FAA isn’t playing. This is the law of the land now and violations could land you some big fines and possible jail time.

You’re A Professional

With your fun new title of aviator comes a lot of responsibility. Whether you’re just enjoying a scenic flight or are a video crew for hire, people are going to want to know you’re playing by the rules.

About Crew Connection

Crew Connection connects you with video production crews across the country and around the globe. With more than 25 years of experience and thousands of shoots with film crew pros to our credit, you can trust our expert coordinators to match you with the right freelance video crew and equipment—every time.

The Future is Wearable (Tips for Staying Competitive in Digital Media)

The Future is Wearable (Tips for Staying Competitive in Digital Media)

The Future is Wearable (Tips for Staying Competitive in Digital Media) 500 550 Crew Connection

Videographically speaking, wearables are epic. Sweeping overhead shots are easier to get and more affordable than ever. People are watching videos on smaller screens and in more locations (i.e., anywhere there’s a signal). Wearable devices, such as the Apple Watch and Google Glass, are shifting in consumers’ minds from unnecessary but fun luxuries to necessities they expect to have in the not so distant future.

Epic Made Easy—and Inexpensive

The word drone is starting to be less associated with airstrikes and more associated with putting cameras in the air. As drones become more accessible and small DSLR cameras more high tech, quality filmmaking is more accessible than ever. On the flip side, average and below average productions are also more accessible than ever—so standing out is increasingly important (and difficult). Stay on your game by aiming to be the best in your niche. If you want drones to provide a slice of your business pie, get ready now. Practice so that when the time is right, you are known as the best.

Go Small or Go Home

Forget big screens; small ones are taking over. *“One in four viewers are watching online video content via their mobile devices” and “the mobile device of choice” is the smallest of all—the smart phone. Make sure you are ready to provide mobile-friendly digital content or you’ll risk losing a large chunk of your potential client’s target audience immediately.

The future is….wearable?

Just when it seems screens can’t get any smaller, the Apple Watch aims to revolutionize the way we view content yet again. Not only is it tiny, powerful, and wearable, it also allows content magnification on a small screen. Until the Apple Watch is released, it may be hard to know what content specs will work best (if you have theories and speculations, please let us know). Be ready to be surprised. And be ready to learn.

As always, technology is changing and impacting digital media. We have to change with it or risk being left behind—holding our devices instead of wearing them.

Post resources:

*2014 Trends

Previous posts in the Drones Among Us series:

Drones Among Us: The Gear

Top 5 Pros and Cons from an Early Adopter

Top 5 Lessons Learned from a New Drone Pilot

Come Fly the Illegal Skies

Cameras Find New Wings: The Next Level For Drones

If you want to explore using a drone for an upcoming shoot, our friends at Crew Connection have crews on the tarmac ready for takeoff.

About Crew Connection

Crew Connection connects you with video production crews across the country and around the globe. With more than 25 years of experience and thousands of shoots with film crew pros to our credit, you can trust our expert coordinators to match you with the right freelance video crew and equipment—every time.

Cameras Find New Wings: The Next Level For Drones

Cameras Find New Wings: The Next Level For Drones

Cameras Find New Wings: The Next Level For Drones 619 200 Crew Connection

With six major film and TV companies getting the green light to fly unmanned aerial vehicles for commercial purposes and a company of aerospace engineers designing products to make drone photography more accessible, the market is moving fast. Such activity is paving the way for more clarity around the laws, simplicity of technology, and of course, wider availability for commercial use.

Just Wednesday, DreamQii launched an IndieGoGo campaign seeking funding for what they see as the next level: PlexiDrones.

Among their signature product’s key, spicy features

Accessibility

This drone makes it easy to not only get the gear in the air, but also to get approved for commercial flying. Pilots still need to apply for their personal certificate, but with its height limits, the device is programmed to obey the law by not exceeding 400 feet in the air.

“One user, many drones”

This brand new “swarm technology” allows for “multi-vantage filming and photography controlled from a single interface.” This means that with one controller, you can have many drones in the air filming the same event at the same time and in the same area.

Follow Me Technology

By using your mobile device as the GPS, this sucker will follow behind you in the air you as you drive, ride, or run.

Retractable landing gear

One of the big complaints for drone pilots to date is the fact that from certain angles, landing gear gets in the way. The PlexiDrone’s retractable landing gear means you can get a 360 degree view without editing.

You don’t have to have a PlexiDrone to go to the next level (and you may not want to wait until March 2015 to get your hands on one). The DJI Phantom is available now and has proven its mettle. Mark Isherwood, a DJI Phantom hobbyist and owner of Freedom House Productions, says that after gaining some experience and confidence, you can take it further by flying with goggles. This allows the operator to watch the footage you’re getting rather than the copter itself.

As Bob Schieffer from CBS’s Drones Over America says: “We’re looking at the future. And whether we like it or not, the future is looking back at us.”

Previous posts in the series

Drones Among Us: Intro

Drones Among Us: The Gear

Top 5 Pros and Cons from an Early Adopter

Top 5 Lessons Learned from a New Drone Pilot

Come Fly the Illegal Skies

About Crew Connection

Crew Connection connects you with video production crews across the country and around the globe. With more than 25 years of experience and thousands of shoots to our credit with film crew pros, you can trust our expert coordinators to match you with the right freelance video crew and equipment every time.

Drones Among Us: Come Fly the Illegal Skies

Drones Among Us: Come Fly the Illegal Skies

Drones Among Us: Come Fly the Illegal Skies 729 474 Crew Connection

The Federal Aviation Association (FAA) insists there is no gray area: Using drones for cash without a permit is illegal. But when drones equipped to fly cameras are as easy to get as commercial permits are hard, you end up with a skyload of illegally-operated unmanned aerial vehicles (as the Drone Dudes’ packed schedule, high-profile clients, and long highlight reel demonstrate).

According to the FAA, “A commercial flight requires a certified aircraft, a licensed pilot and operating approval.” Fines can be steep, but in 2012, the National Transportation Safety Board dismissed a $10,000 fine against one operator, likely emboldening others.

Illegal usage is the name of the game right now. Some operators are blatantly ignoring the rules and simply not requesting permits (which are frequently denied). Others create their own fudgery by offering airborne services but only charging for editing (though perhaps at a premium fee).

Those who want to fly above board are in for a tough road or a long wait. Last summer (2013), the FAA granted one permit for commercial operation. This summer, BP gained permission to operate a small craft, originally designed for the military, to perform aerial surveys. By this time next summer, the FAA will need to be near a plan for “safe integration” of unmanned aircraft systems. Operators are eagerly awaiting the Congress-mandated deadline—September 30th, 2015.

Some, like Mark Isherwood of Freedom House Productions (who has served as our primary source for the Drones Among Us series) are getting ready for the inevitable demand.

They are gaining experience by flying over private land and in accordance with model aircraft guidelines as they await word from the FAA, which is under increasing pressure to open access and is also considering exemptions for the film industry.

In the meantime, the industry is forging on: Skilled operators are flying and eager clients are buying.

Previous posts in the series:

Drones Among Us: Intro

Drones Among Us: The Gear

Top 5 Pros and Cons from an Early Adopter

Top 5 Lessons Learned from a New Drone Pilot

 

About Crew Connection

Crew Connection connects you with video production crews across the country and around the globe. With more than 25 years of experience and thousands of shoots to our credit with film crew pros, you can trust our expert coordinators to match you with the right freelance video crew and equipment every time.